Auckland's Climate Action Plan

Designing out waste

10 Ideas
91 Votes
14 Comments
66 Subscribers

How can Auckland move to a more circular economy?

Currently, most items we buy are not designed to be re-purposed or recycled – they are destined for landfill. How do we change this?

A circular economy is a zero-waste system in which every item is designed to be re-purposed and re-used. In other words, in a circular economy, what was once considered ‘waste’ is seen as a resource: it becomes the raw materials for something else.

Moving to a circular economy would reduce our overall energy consumption, resource use and waste production. It also creates opportunities for innovation and increased recycling and re-purposing of goods.

How can we drive the shift to a more circular economy within government, businesses and households? Do you have ideas about where we can start?

Watch this video to learn more.

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  1. Janet Cole
    125 pts
  2. Ellen ellen.sch@orcon.net.nz
    105 pts
  3. Richard Neate
    60 pts
  4. Monty Walsh
    50 pts
  5. Charles Widdicombe
    44 pts

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Idea thumbnail

Glass and plastic bottles must be re-used to prevent plastic waste and energy used in remaking bottles. The consumer buys their full bottles by crate or in bulk and pays a deposit for the bottles. The empties are taken back to the shop in return for the deposit. Use of glass would be encouraged because glass is environmentally better and can be fully recycled

Tim Rainbow
by Tim Rainbow
1 Votes
Comments 2
Tim Rainbow
Idea thumbnail

A NON-BRAINER Raw sewage will flow into our creeks and harbours for many years to come. Nutrients we eat and don't convert into energy are lost in blackwater toxic sewage sludge. Changing rules to allow for safe multi chamber composting toilets as a second/third toilet in a dwelling in urban city limits can help - provide an alternative safe toilet function during infrastructure failures or natural disasters, - reduce sewage overflow, - save valuable drinking water, - recycle valuable...

Ellen ellen.sch@orcon.net.nz
20 Votes
Comments 6
Ellen ellen.sch@orcon.net.nz

Take a 3D printer that uses plastic as a material. Have people come and exchange plastic bottles for store credit. Break the bottles down into material and make whatever the client wants. Have a 3D scanner there so people can bring in their broken parts, fixing things instead of throwing them away.

Sam Yockney
by Sam Yockney
0 Votes
Comments 0
Sam Yockney

We need a radical mind-set shift to tackle our pressing sustainability challenges.

Barbara Ribeiro
by Barbara Ribeiro
2 Votes
Comments 1
Barbara Ribeiro

Let's put the cost of disposing of packaging onto the manufacturer though a levy.  When it costs them you'll be amazed how quickly they'll find ways to reduce packaging and make what's left recyclable.

Richard Neate
by Richard Neate
11 Votes
Comments 2
Richard Neate

Buy less stuff. Stuff is waste.

kelp strewn
by kelp strewn
3 Votes
Comments 0
kelp strewn

In the UK you can drop off small old batteries in pharmacies and supermarkets, making it a lot more convenient for people to dispose of them carefully. We should try this here.

Jennifer Joynt
by Jennifer Joynt
4 Votes
Comments 0
Jennifer Joynt

Educate the public and set up e-waste collections and drop off centres to collect things like computers, appliances etc.  Maybe this is part of the inorganic collection already?

Charles Widdicombe
by Charles Widdicombe
8 Votes
Comments 1
Charles Widdicombe

If you're a company that uses a bottle, you need to be able to accept the old bottles. Companies use bottles all the time but its usually a one way delivery. Restaurants, bars and cafes all get bottle delivery, but it should be that when you finish with the bottles, you put them back in the box and give it back when the new ones are delivered. Its so much easier to wash bottles you know fit in your processing plant than make or re-melt new ones. 

Monty Walsh
by Monty Walsh
11 Votes
Comments 0
Monty Walsh

What if everything we made, built, designed had to have an agreed proportion of secondhand/ reused/ upcycled/ repurposed/ reprocessed materials? In many cases, this is possible now, but companies don't want to be the first off the block. Let's incorporate this into every contract so it's an even playing field.

Janet Cole
by Janet Cole
31 Votes
Comments 2
Janet Cole
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